Mount Kelud volcano erupts

 

Indonesia volcano erupts; 3 killed, 100K evacuated

The overnight eruption of Java island's Mount Kelud could be heard up to 200 kilometers away, Indonesia's disaster agency said.
Villagers get off a truck upon arrival at a temporary shelter after being evacuated from their homes on the slope of Mount Kelud, in Blitar, Friday, Feb. 14, 2014.

Published on 14th Feb 2014

An explosive volcanic eruption on Indonesia’s most populous island blasted ash and debris 18 kilometers into the air, killing three people while forcing authorities to evacuate more than 100,000 and close seven airports.

The overnight eruption of Java island’s Mount Kelud could be heard up to 200 kilometers away, Indonesia’s disaster agency said.

....

“The eruption sounded like thousands of bombs exploding,” Ratno Pramono, a 35-year-old farmer, said after returning from an evacuation center to check on his property in the village of Sugihwaras, around five kilometers (three miles) from the crater. “I thought doomsday was upon us. Women and children were screaming and crying.”

 

Ash and grit fell to earth in towns and cities across the region, including Surabaya, Indonesia’s second-largest city after Jakarta, with a population of about 3 million. It also fell even farther afield in Yogyakarta, where motorists switched on headlights in daylight.

A 60-year-old woman and an 80-year-old man were killed in the village of Pandansari, about seven kilometers from the mountain, when the roofs of their homes collapsed under the weight of the ash and volcanic debris unleashed during the eruption, the disaster agency said. A 70-year-old man died after being hit by a collapsed wall while waiting to be evacuated from Pandansari, where the volcanic ash lay up to eight inches deep in some places. The large international airport in Surabaya and airports in the cities of Malang, Yogyakarta, Solo, Bandung, Semarang and Cilacap were closed due to reduced visibility and the dangers posed to aircraft engines by ash, Transport Ministry spokesman Bambang Ervan said.

 

Virgin Australia said it had cancelled its today’s flights from Australia to several locations due to the eruption, including the resort islands of Bali in Indonesia and Phuket in Thailand.

Workers frantically cover Boroburdur temple to protect it from any spewing ash from the nearby volcano. (Above)

 

 

The disaster agency said tremors were still wracking the volcano, but that scientists didn’t expect another major eruption. It said all villages within 10 kilometers of Kelud more than 100,000 people had been evacuated to temporary shelters, but that some villagers were returning to their homes to begin cleaning up.

The 1,731-meter-high Mount Kelud in eastern Java Indonesia’s most densely populated island and home to more than half of the country’s 240 million people has been rumbling for several weeks and was under close observation. The mountain is about 600 kilometres east of Jakarta, the capital.

 

 

A spectacular volcanic eruption in Indonesia - killed three people and forced mass evacuations, disrupting long-haul flights and closing international airports.

.

Mount Kelud, considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes on the main island of Java, spewed red-hot ash and rocks high into the air late Thursday night just hours after its alert status was raised.

 

Villagers in eastern Java described the terror of volcanic materials raining down on their homes, while AFP correspondents at the scene saw residents covered in grey dust fleeing in cars and on motorbikes towards evacuation centres.

Sunar, a 60-year-old from a village eight kilometres (five miles) in Blitar district, said his home also collapsed after being hit with "rocks the size of fists".

"The whole place was shaking -- it was like we were on a ship in high seas. We fled and could see lava in the distance flowing into a river," said Sunar, who goes by one name.

 

A man and a woman, both elderly, were crushed to death after volcanic material that had blanketed rooftops caused their homes in the sub-district of Malang to cave in, National Disaster Mitigation Agency Spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said, while another elderly man died from inhaling the ash.

Dian Julihadi, 32, from Blitar district, said: "It was like fireworks. There was a loud bang and bright red lights shot up into the air."

Nugroho confirmed the materials were still raining down on villages within a radius of 15 kilometres from the volcano on Friday, but said that some activities were resuming "as normal".

 

Some 200,000 people were ordered to evacuate, though some families ignored the orders and others have returned home, with just over 75,000 now in temporary shelters, Nugroho said.

Several men who had earlier tried to return home to gather clothing and valuables -were forced back by the continuous downpour of volcanic materials.

Mount Kelud is considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes on the densely populated Java.

Around 200,000 people from 36 villages in a 10 kilometre area around the mountain have been told to evacuate.

Photo: Villagers evacuated from their homes, due to the eruption of Mount Kelud, sleep on the floor at a temporary shelter in the village of Sumber Agung.
   
Luthfan Herdyanto is a resident in the city of Yogjakarta which is about 300 kilometres away from the mountain.

He says the ash shower caused by the eruption is evident even as far as he is.

"It's looking like snow, like wet snow. People are covering their faces from the ash with masks. We cannot see the way. It's about two metres. We can see two metres in front of us if we drive a car and many people stay at home here now, because the situation is not good."

 

A spectacular volcanic eruption in Indonesia has killed three people and forced mass evacuations, disrupting long-haul flights and closing international airports.

Mount Kelud, considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes on the main island of Java, spewed red-hot ash and rocks high into the sky late on Thursday night just hours after its alert status was raised.

Villagers in eastern Java described the terror of volcanic materials raining down on their homes, while journalists at the scene saw residents covered in grey dust fleeing in cars and on motorbikes towards evacuation centres.

Sunar, a 60-year-old from a village eight kilometres in Blitar district, said his home also collapsed after being hit with "rocks the size of fists".

"The whole place was shaking - it was like we were on a ship in high seas. We fled and could see lava in the distance flowing into a river," said Sunar, who goes by one name.

 

A man and a woman, both elderly, were crushed to death after volcanic material that had blanketed rooftops caused their homes in the sub-district of Malang to cave in, National Disaster Mitigation Agency Spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said, while another elderly man died from inhaling the ash.

Dian Julihadi, 32, from Blitar district, said: "It was like fireworks. There was a loud bang and bright red lights shot up into the air."

Nugroho confirmed the materials were still raining down on villages within a radius of 15km from the volcano on Friday, but said that some activities were resuming "as normal".

Some 200,000 people were ordered to evacuate, though some families ignored the orders and others have returned home, with just over 75,000 now in temporary shelters, Nugroho said.

Several men, who had earlier tried to return home to gather clothing and valuables, were forced back by the continuous downpour of volcanic materials.

The ash has blanketed eastern Javanese cities, forcing seven airports to close, including those in Surabaya, Yogyakarta, Solo, Semarang and Bandung, which serve international flights, officials said, while grounded planes were seen covered in the dust.

"All flights to those airports have been cancelled, and other flights, including some between Australia and Indonesia, have been rerouted," Transport Ministry director general of aviation Herry Bakti said, adding it was "too dangerous to fly" near the plume.

Virgin Australia said in a statement it had cancelled all its flights to and from Phuket, Bali, Christmas Island and Cocos Island on Friday, adding that "the safety of our customers is the highest priority" and that the airline would keep monitoring conditions.

Australian nurse Susanne Webster, 38, was on a late-morning Virgin flight from Sydney to Bali that was turned around.

"About two hours in, the pilot announced (that) over in Indonesia there was a volcano that erupted and that we were turning the plane back," she told AFP, adding they were still in Australian airspace at the time.

Qantas postponed Friday flights between Jakarta and Sydney to Saturday, while Singapore Airlines and Cathay Pacific cancelled and postponed flights to Surabaya, a popular destination for golfing tourists.

Air Asia said 21 flights were affected in total, including three between Indonesian and Malaysia, adding several flights over Java were cancelled.

The Centre for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation said there was little chance of another eruption as powerful as Thursday night's, but tremors could still be felt Friday as communities began clearing piles of ash up to five centimetres high on roads.

 

The 1731m Mount Kelud has claimed more than 15,000 lives since 1500, including about 10,000 deaths in a massive eruption in 1568.

It is one of 130 active volcanoes in Indonesia, which sits on the Pacific Ring of Fire, a belt of seismic activity running around the basin of the Pacific Ocean.

 

 

The eruption of Indonesia’s Mount Kelud volcano on Java island has forced airlines to cancel flights and prompted thousands of residents to flee the area.

Airports in Surabaya, the country’s second largest city, Yogyakarta and Solo closed today and the transport ministry issued a flight warning for pilots to avoid passing over eastern Java, said Bambang Ervan, the ministry’s spokesman. Carriers Singapore Airlines Ltd (SIA), PT Garuda Indonesia (GIAA) and PT Lion Mentari Airlines said today they have suspended flights to those cities.

“The volcanic ash was so thick, so for the safety of the flights, we decided to shut those airports since this morning,” Ervan said. “The ash has covered the runways.”

The volcano first erupted at 10.50 p.m. local time yesterday, and the country’s disaster management agency asked thousands of local residents to evacuate and stay outside a 10-kilometer (6-mile) radius, spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said today.

 

The East Java province is home to sugar and coffee plantations, and cigarette factories for PT Gudang Garam (GGRM), PT Wismilak Inti Makmur (WIIM) and PT Hanjaya Mandala Sampoerna. (HMSP)

Flights between Singapore and Australia may be affected and airlines have been advised to take alternative routes, Ervan said. Singapore Airlines scrapped flights to Surabaya, the company said in an e-mail today. Qantas Airways Ltd. (QAN) said flights on its Jakarta-Sydney route will be delayed up to 24 hours.

Garuda Indonesia also canceled flights to Malang, a city about 30 kilometers east of the volcano, until at least tomorrow morning, Pujobroto, a spokesman for the airline, said by phone today. Its flights to other destinations are unaffected so far.

 

In 1982, all four engines on a British Airways Boeing Co. 747 stalled when the plane encountered ash spewed from Mount Galunggung in Indonesia. The plane fell for almost four miles before the pilot was able to restart three engines and make an emergency landing in Jakarta.

 

 

PHOTOS of SOLO City:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHOTOS of YOGYAKARTA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EVACUATING MALAM -- EAST JAVA

 

 

 

 

PHOTOS of KEDIRI:

 

 

 

 

 

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Indonesian volcano brings life as well as death

 

 

SIDOMULYO: (Indonesia): The ash and debris that Indonesia's Mount Kelud blasted from its belly brought death and misery, and disrupted international air traffic. But for many of the millions of people cleaning up on Saturday in the wake of the explosive eruption, it was also a money earner and a shot of life for their crops.

 

"This is a blessing of the disaster," said Imam Choiri, a 55-year-old farmer who was scraping up the ash from the road to use as fertilizer on his small vegetable plot a few kilometers from the crater of the mountain, which was rumbling and smoking in the background. Choiri said locals believe the ash helps drive away pests from crops.

 

The eruption of the 1,731-meter (5,680-foot) -high mountain on Java island late Thursday was one of the most dramatic to hit Indonesia in recent years, with ash falling as far as 600 kilometers (370 miles) away. Three people were killed when their roofs caved in under the weight of ash, while around 100,000 fled.

On Saturday, scientists said Kelud's activities were dying down, in line with its reputation as a mountain that blows its top dramatically but then quickly settles down for another 10 years or so. But authorities warned that water from its crater, along with rain, could bring deadly landslides of fresh ash and rocks down river beds into villages and valleys.

Army troops enforced a ban on people returning to houses within 10 kilometers (6 miles) of the volcano, but many people sneaked back to check on livestock and clean up. Authorities were finding it hard to prevent people from returning, given the money farmers stand to lose by staying away.

"Our cows need to be milked. If they aren't, they can get sick and die," said Marjito, a 45-year-old man who was riding on a motorbike with his wife to his village around 5 kilometers (3 miles) from the crater.

"We have so much work to do, including running and hiding from security officers," said his wife, Dinayah. Like many Indonesians, both go by a single name.

 

Six airports on Java - Indonesia's most densely populated island and home to more than half of the country's 240 million people - remained closed, including the international hub that serves the country's second-largest city, Surabaya. Transport officials said this was because of ash on the runway and on planes, not in the atmosphere, and said the airports would likely reopen before Monday.

A massive cleanup was underway in the region, where millions of homes received ash fall. Police and soldiers used water cannons to clear roads that in places were covered in up to 10 centimeters (4 inches) of white ash. Supporters of political parties campaigning for April elections, wearing party colors, also chipped in and gave out food, seeking to win votes on the back of their assistance. Many people were wearing face masks to protect against the dust that remained in the air.

Kelud's last major eruption was in 1990, when it spewed out searing fumes and lava that killed more than 30 people and injured hundreds. In 1919, a powerful explosion that reportedly could be heard hundreds of kilometers away killed at least 5,160 people.

Indonesia, a sprawling archipelagic nation, is prone to volcanic eruptions and earthquakes because of its location on the Pacific "Ring of Fire" - a series of fault lines stretching from the Western Hemisphere through Japan and Southeast Asia.

Thirty-eight of the country's roughly 130 active volcanoes are on Java, forming a spine along the island's center. The regular dustings of the land volcanic eruptions bring help ensure soil fertility. Regular rain and sun mean rice, plants, coffee and fruit are easily cultivated.

Volcanic ash and debris are prized in the building industry because they make especially strong cement, and sand diggers can charge almost twice as much per load than they can for regular sand. Scores of diggers were collecting the fresh, easy-to-dig sand Saturday, packing the windfall into bags or onto trucks.

"Kelud is a valuable source of livelihood to me and my family," Harjito Huda, 30, a traditional sand miner from Ngancar village, said with a smile.

 

 

RELATED: FEB 1st Mount SINABUNG ERUPTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted article here

and Posted Here

.http://www.businessweek.com/news/2014-02-13/indonesia-volcano-eruption-closes-airports-as-thousands-flee

 

.http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2014/02/14/indon-volcano-kills-three-grounds-planes

 

 

http://indianexpress.com/article/world/world-others/indonesia-volcano-erupts-3-killed-100k-evacuated/

 

 

http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/21465130/Bali-flights-turned-back-due-to-volcanic-eruption/

 

 

 

 

 

 

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, some portions of the above articles posted on this website are distributed for their included information without profit for research and/or educational purposes only. This website has no affiliation whatsoever with the original sources of the articles nor are we sponsored or endorsed by any of the original sources.|

  •  

     

     

 
Enjoyed this article? Share it
ADD A COMMENT

Our comment will be approved by moderators.